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rhamphotheca:

Meet China’s baby-shaped pears and heart-shaped melons
Baby-shaped pears, heart-shaped watermelons and square apples are hitting supermarkets in China and Japan. But are these fruits just frivolous fun?
by Bec Crew
Since the beginnings of agriculture, humans have been customising their fruits and vegetables to suit their needs. Early on, bigger fruits and higher yields were the most important considerations, and while these factors still outweigh the actual taste factor, other, slightly less pressing desires have come into play over the past decade or so.
Namely, people want to eat fruit that doesn’t look like regular fruit.
Which is how baby-shaped pears have come into existence. Grown by China-based manufacturing company, Fruit Mould Co., these strange little shapes have been selling like crazy in China, along with square-shaped apples, and heart-shaped watermelons and cucumbers. Their Buddha-shaped pears are apparently extremely popular…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia & NZ)
photos: Fruit Mould Co.

rhamphotheca:

Meet China’s baby-shaped pears and heart-shaped melons

Baby-shaped pears, heart-shaped watermelons and square apples are hitting supermarkets in China and Japan. But are these fruits just frivolous fun?

by Bec Crew

Since the beginnings of agriculture, humans have been customising their fruits and vegetables to suit their needs. Early on, bigger fruits and higher yields were the most important considerations, and while these factors still outweigh the actual taste factor, other, slightly less pressing desires have come into play over the past decade or so.

Namely, people want to eat fruit that doesn’t look like regular fruit.

Which is how baby-shaped pears have come into existence. Grown by China-based manufacturing company, Fruit Mould Co., these strange little shapes have been selling like crazy in China, along with square-shaped apples, and heart-shaped watermelons and cucumbers. Their Buddha-shaped pears are apparently extremely popular

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia & NZ)

photos: Fruit Mould Co.

(Source: invocado)

ilovecharts:

How My Dog Sees The World
This week, Ross checks in on everybody after a difficult week.

ilovecharts:

How My Dog Sees The World

This week, Ross checks in on everybody after a difficult week.

Dear patient: Your 5-minute appointment is awaiting you.

SUSAN HECKER, MD | PHYSICIAN | JULY 25, 2014

Dear patient:

I am writing to inform you of some recent changes to my practice. These changes have been implemented to improve the quality of your care.


I will no longer be able to see you for a 20-minute or 40-minute appointment. These will instead be shortened to a 10-minute or 20 minute-appointment based on your stated needs. For example, if you just need a physical exam, we will do this in 20 minutes. I am told easier things should take more time.

However, if you would like to talk to me about the fact that you have lost 30 pounds these last three months, have a past history of cancer and you’re not sure if you want chemotherapy again, this should take only 10 minutes because your concern is just “weight loss.” I am not allowed to make special accommodations for your concerns; if I do, I am giving away care and contributing to the current health care crisis. I am also not to consider the fact that you traveled 60 minutes, took unpaid time off from your job, or spent half your day arranging for childcare to see me.

Because of these schedule enhancements, I will likely rush through our time together and gloss over details. I will need to spend my time multitasking with the computer as I can only prove the quality of my care by checking boxes. Do not worry; studies have shown that physicians can’t multitask any better than anyone else and I will likely miss important details. In order to make up for that fact, I will order a bunch of unnecessary tests so I don’t miss anything.

Yes, I could probably figure out you don’t need half of them if we spent more time together, but I am told just talking to patients is poorly compensated care and I need to be mindful of this. I will rush out of the door onto my next patient who has been waiting over 30 minutes to see me to do the same to them.

You may call back because the problem we addressed has not resolved. Instead of thinking about your issue further, I will refer you on to a specialist because I am too exhausted to think. This is a much better use of resources, you see, because the specialist is trained to deal with very complicated and specific diseases. It is much better for them to see something that is straightforward and not use their training appropriately because that would require thinking and I have already shown you that thinking does not pay the bills.

You will see the very nice specialist I send you to and will feel reassured that they will know a lot about your health already because we have electronic records these days. However, I will forget to request to have your records sent over with your referral because I spent five hours on more important tasks such as typing, checking boxes and electronically filing paperwork; I am told only someone with 7 to 10 years of post collegiate training has the capability to do this. The specialist will not be able to see all your records because our systems do not communicate, but will receive something we call a problem list. However, she will miss part of your health history because it is buried in a list of 50 other very important diagnoses such as “pimple,” “cold,” or “administered vaccine.”

That detail will be important. You will not get better and will go to the ED. The ED physician will decide that he needs to hospitalize you after talking to you for two minutes, most of which he interrupts you to ask a question. Do not worry; the ED physician does this because he needs to see 50 patients in one hour. This is the patient-centered care you see advertised on billboards as 10 minute or less wait times.

You will have the opportunity to meet at least three more doctors while you are in the hospital. Do not expect them to be attentive or explain anything; they have been working for the last ten days in a row and can’t remember the details of your problem. When they write down the medications you should take when you go home, they will forget to include your water pill because they got 15 phone calls in 5 minutes.

You will likely gain 10 pounds because you didn’t restart your water pill when you get home. Do not worry; we are more efficient at providing quality care than ever before. There is now a 5-minute appointment awaiting you.

Susan Hecker is a physician.


Raised on Maui. BS/MS degree in California. DPM-bound in Des Moines, IA. Follower of Jesus. Trying to live a life to make Him proud of. I enjoy seeking the beauty in nature, music, and people. For fun, I have hopes to capture my likes, experiences, and good times here in this wondrous state and beyond.

My Top 10 Everything
God's everlasting love
Nature
Squirrels
Comfortable silence
Fellowship
The ocean
Exploring
Sunset/Sunrise
Staying up late
80F weather